Murano and its surroundings

“In this way, the mansions arranged along either bank of the canal made one think of objects of nature, but of a nature which seemed to have created its works with a human imagination.”

Marcel Proust

“Murano is a lively town in the Venetian lagoon, about 1 km from Venice and can be reached by public waterbus in about 5 minutes, or by swimming, but only for the bravest! You can reach Murano in 30 minutes by public transport from the airport, from Piazza San Marco and Saint Lucia train station. Murano is made up of seven islands and is part of the municipality of Venice.

With about 4,500 inhabitants, Murano is one of the most populated islands of the Venetian Lagoon after Venice. Murano is divided into two parts by its main canal and is divided by smaller canals and connected by bridges. Murano is known throughout the world for its production of Murano glass.

“Murano is a lively town in the Venetian lagoon, about 1 km from Venice and can be reached by public waterbus in about 5 minutes, or by swimming, but only for the bravest! You can reach Murano in 30 minutes by public transport from the airport, from Piazza San Marco and Saint Lucia train station. Murano is made up of seven islands and is part of the municipality of Venice.

With about 4,500 inhabitants, Murano is one of the most populated islands of the Venetian Lagoon after Venice. Murano is divided into two parts by its main canal and is divided by smaller canals and connected by bridges. Murano is known throughout the world for its production of Murano glass.

The legend

Pliny the Elder ( 23-79 d.c. ) says that some sailors landed on a Phoenician beach, they began to cook their food in a pot supported by some pieces of natron, a kind of soda ash. After a while they realized what flowed from under the pot was a transparent material and it was glowing, when cooled, it solidified. This is how glass was born. Random encounters with sand containing silicon, with nitro containing soda acting as a flux. This legend may only be, in fact a legend, but it’s nice to believe.

The legend

Pliny the Elder ( 23-79 d.c. ) says that some sailors landed on a Phoenician beach, they began to cook their food in a pot supported by some pieces of natron, a kind of soda ash. After a while they realized what flowed from under the pot was a transparent material and it was glowing, when cooled, it solidified. This is how glass was born. Random encounters with sand containing silicon, with nitro containing soda acting as a flux. This legend may only be, in fact a legend, but it’s nice to believe.

The glass

In 1605 the Venetian Republic established The Golden Book where the names of the original families of Murano were written, and only they could exercise the art of glass. The glassmakers enjoyed many privileges such as, being the first officers of the republican ministry, coin money with their name (the oselle), go about armed with a knife (the spadina), and their daughters could also marry a nobleman, and their heirs retained all the rights of nobility.

The glass

In 1605 the Venetian Republic established The Golden Book where the names of the original families of Murano were written, and only they could exercise the art of glass. The glassmakers enjoyed many privileges such as, being the first officers of the republican ministry, coin money with their name (the oselle), go about armed with a knife (the spadina), and their daughters could also marry a nobleman, and their heirs retained all the rights of nobility.

HISTORY OF MURANO GLASSMAKING

Murano’s reputation as a centre for glassmaking was born during the Venetian Republic, fearing fire and destruction to the city’s mostly wooden buildings, all the foundries within the city in 1291 were destroyed. Though the Republic ordered the destruction of the foundries, it authorized and encouraged construction outside the city, and by the late 13th century, the glassmaking industry was built in Murano.

Murano’s glassmakers were soon the island’s most prominent citizens. By the 14th century, glassmakers were allowed to carry swords, enjoyed immunity from prosecution by the Venetian state and had their daughters married into Venice’s most affluent families. Of course there was a catch: Glassmakers were not allowed to leave the Republic. Many craftsmen took this risk, however, and set up glass furnaces in surrounding cities and as far as England and the Netherlands.

Murano’s glassmakers held a monopoly on quality glassmaking for centuries, developing or refining many technologies including crystalline glass, enameled glass (smalto), glass with threads of gold (aventurine), multicoloured glass (millefiori), milk glass (lattimo), and imitation gemstones made of glass. Today, the artisans of Murano are still employing these centuries-old techniques, crafting everything from contemporary art glass and glass jewelry to Murano glass chandeliers and wine stoppers.

Today, Murano is home to the Museo Vetrario or Glass Museum in the Palazzo Giustinian, which holds an exhibition on the history of glassmaking, as well as glass items ranging from Egyptian times through to the present day

HISTORY OF MURANO GLASSMAKING

Murano’s reputation as a centre for glassmaking was born during the Venetian Republic, fearing fire and destruction to the city’s mostly wooden buildings, all the foundries within the city in 1291 were destroyed. Though the Republic ordered the destruction of the foundries, it authorized and encouraged construction outside the city, and by the late 13th century, the glassmaking industry was built in Murano.

Murano’s glassmakers were soon the island’s most prominent citizens. By the 14th century, glassmakers were allowed to carry swords, enjoyed immunity from prosecution by the Venetian state and had their daughters married into Venice’s most affluent families. Of course there was a catch: Glassmakers were not allowed to leave the Republic. Many craftsmen took this risk, however, and set up glass furnaces in surrounding cities and as far as England and the Netherlands.

Murano’s glassmakers held a monopoly on quality glassmaking for centuries, developing or refining many technologies including crystalline glass, enameled glass (smalto), glass with threads of gold (aventurine), multicoloured glass (millefiori), milk glass (lattimo), and imitation gemstones made of glass. Today, the artisans of Murano are still employing these centuries-old techniques, crafting everything from contemporary art glass and glass jewelry to Murano glass chandeliers and wine stoppers.

Today, Murano is home to the Museo Vetrario or Glass Museum in the Palazzo Giustinian, which holds an exhibition on the history of glassmaking, as well as glass items ranging from Egyptian times through to the present day

MURANO TODAY

On Murano today there are about fifty factories that produce blown chandeliers, glasses, sculptures. Some laboratories do lampworking, decoration, engraving, and grinding. Some factories organize tours of their show rooms and a glass work demonstration.

BOOK YOUR STAY IN VENICE VILLA LINA

FOR INFORMATION

MURANO TODAY

On Murano today there are about fifty factories that produce blown chandeliers, glasses, sculptures. Some laboratories do lampworking, decoration, engraving, and grinding. Some factories organize tours of their show rooms and a glass work demonstration.

BOOK YOUR STAY IN VENICE VILLA LINA

FOR INFORMATION

NOT TO BE MISSED

In 1700, Murano had many churches and many monasteries, of which rumor has it that Casanova was a devoted, but not very religious, regular.
The churches that remained after Napoleonic times are: the Basilica of St. Donato, the Romanesque church founded in the seventh century with splendid mosaics, the church of St. Peter the Martyr from the fourteenth century with paintings by Veronese, Tintoretto, Bellini, and a beautiful wooden sacristy, and the church of St. Mary of the Angels from the twelfth century which has been recently restored.

The Glass museum that displays glass from all periods. In the ceiling of a room on the first floor you can admire the coats of arms of the illustrious families of Murano.

The marble lighthouse of Murano is still an important reference point for ships coming into Venice.

NOT TO BE MISSED

In 1700, Murano had many churches and many monasteries, of which rumor has it that Casanova was a devoted, but not very religious, regular.
The churches that remained after Napoleonic times are: the Basilica of St. Donato, the Romanesque church founded in the seventh century with splendid mosaics, the church of St. Peter the Martyr from the fourteenth century with paintings by Veronese, Tintoretto, Bellini, and a beautiful wooden sacristy, and the church of St. Mary of the Angels from the twelfth century which has been recently restored.

The Glass museum that displays glass from all periods. In the ceiling of a room on the first floor you can admire the coats of arms of the illustrious families of Murano.

The marble lighthouse of Murano is still an important reference point for ships coming into Venice.

Villa Lina Venezia Murano

BURANO

The beautiful island of fishermen and lace makers with unique colorful houses.

Villa Lina Venezia Torcello

TORCELLO

One of the most ancient and prosperous settlements of the lagoon until the decline resulting in the birth of Venice. Visit the Cathedral of Santa Maria Assunta that dates back to 639 and the small church of Santa Fosca from the eleventh century.

Villa Lina Venezia Murano

LIDO DI VENEZIA

An island famous for its beautiful beach, villas, and of course the Venice Film Festival and the Casino.